Federal Skilled Worker Program Canada

Canada Immigration

Skilled Visa

Want to live and work in Canada? The Skilled Worker Visa is the most popular Canadian Visa.

Every year, over 90,000 foreign workers enter Canada to work temporarily to help Canadian employers address skill shortages. Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CC) and Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC) ensure that these workers will support economic growth in Canada and create more opportunities for all Canadian job seekers.

Federal skilled worker applications received on or after February 27, 2008 are now assessed for eligibility according to a set of criteria issued by the Minister of Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism.

You can find out more about the criteria in the Learn about section at the bottom of this page.

Your application will be reviewed in two steps.

1. According to the eligibility criteria, your application is eligible for processing if:

Eligibility criteria for federal skilled worker applications

Under changes to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, federal skilled worker applications are assessed for eligibility according to the criteria listed below. Note: This does not apply to applicants intending to live in the province of Quebec

These criteria affect you only if you applied on or after June 26, 2010. If your application was received before June 26, 2010, it will be processed according to the rules that were in effect at that time.

Note: If you are applying under one of the 29 eligible occupations, as of June 26, 2010, a maximum of 20,000 Federal Skilled Worker applications will be considered for processing in the following 12 months. Within the 20,000 cap, a maximum of 1,000 Federal Skilled Worker applications per eligible occupation will be considered for processing each year.

These limits do not apply to applications with an offer of arranged employment.

Is my application eligible for processing?

For your application to be eligible for processing, you must include the results of your official language proficiency test, and either:

  • Have a valid offer of arranged employment, OR
  • Be a skilled worker who has had one year of continuous full-time or equivalent part-time paid work experience in at least one of the following eligible occupations within the last ten years:
    • 0631 Restaurant and Food Service Managers
    • 0811 Primary Production Managers (Except Agriculture)
    • 1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management
    • 1233 Insurance Adjusters and Claims Examiners
    • 2121 Biologists and Related Scientists
    • 2151 Architects
    • 3111 Specialist Physicians
    • 3112 General Practitioners and Family Physicians
    • 3113 Dentists
    • 3131 Pharmacists
    • 3142 Physiotherapists
    • 3152 Registered Nurses
    • 3215 Medical Radiation Technologists
    • 3222 Dental Hygienists & Dental Therapists
    • 3233 Licensed Practical Nurses
    • 4151 Psychologists
    • 4152 Social Workers
    • 6241 Chefs
    • 6242 Cooks
    • 7215 Contractors and Supervisors, Carpentry Trades
    • 7216 Contractors and Supervisors, Mechanic Trades
    • 7241 Electricians (Except Industrial & Power System)
    • 7242 Industrial Electricians
    • 7251 Plumbers
    • 7265 Welders & Related Machine Operators
    • 7312 Heavy-Duty Equipment Mechanics
    • 7371 Crane Operators
    • 7372 Drillers & Blasters - Surface Mining, Quarrying & Construction
    • 8222 Supervisors, Oil and Gas Drilling and Service

Skilled Workers (Independent Immigrants) are accepted for entry into Canada depending on the number of points they score out of 100 in the following categories:

Category Maximum Points
Education 25
Language Proficiency 24
Work Experience 21
Arranged Employment 10
Age 10
Adaptability 10
TOTAL POINTS (Maximum) 100
PASSING SCORE 67

Immigration point system for skilled workers:

More points have been allocated for applicants with a trade certificate or a second degree.

The maximum number of points available for proficiency in both English and French combined has been increased from 20 to 24. Workers who are proficient in both languages will score more points. A new assessment level that recognizes "basic proficiency" has been added to the three existing levels (high, moderate and none). These changes are expected to result in more bilingual (English and French) workers being admitted to Canada.

The total number of points available for "experience" has been reduced to 21 from 25, and more points will be awarded for one to two years of work experience. This is expected to attract younger workers who may have higher levels of education but fewer years of experience.

The "age factor" has been adjusted upwards, so that workers between the ages of 21 and 49 will score the maximum number of points (10 points). This is expected to make it easier for older workers to gain entry to Canada under the Skilled Worker Class.

The pass mark has been set at 67 points to respond to concerns raised by the provinces and territories and others that a high pass would bar many skilled immigrants.

Applicants must provide a proof of funds that he/she will bring to Canada for their initial expense. Overall, the changes to the Skilled Worker Category are expected to open up the category to a broader range of applicants with the skills and education needed to drive economic growth and innovation in Canada.

Below please find an explanation of how the points for each factor are assessed and determined:

EDUCATION FACTOR (maximum 25 points) :

The Education Factor is an assessment of your completed education. A specific number of points correspond to each level of completed education. For each educational credential, there is a specific number of full-time (or full-time equivalent) years that you must have completed in order to obtain the points that correspond to that education credential* (*consult with Fast Canada Immigration if you did not complete the number of years required).

If you have more than one educational credential, you are assessed by whichever credential results in you being awarded the highest number of points for this factor. (Example: if an applicant has a 3-year college diploma and a 2-year university bachelor’s degree, this applicant should receive 22 points for the diploma instead of 20 points for the degree.)

Use the following chart to determine how many points you should receive for the Education Factor:

EDUCATIONAL CREDENTIALS MAXIMUM 25 POINTS
Master’s Degree or Ph.D. AND at least 17 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 25
Two or more university degrees at the bachelor’s level AND at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 22
Three-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship AND at least 15 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 22
Two-year university degree at the bachelor’s level AND at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 20
Two-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship AND at least 14 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 20
One-year university degree at the bachelor’s level AND at least 13 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 15
One-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship AND at least 13 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 15
One-year diploma, trade certificate or apprenticeship AND at least 12 years of full-time or full-time equivalent study. 12
Completed high school. 5

LANGUAGE FACTOR (maximum 24 points):

Points for the Language Factor are awarded for high, moderate or basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing in English and French, Canada’s two official languages. Your “first official language” should be whichever of these languages you have the best ability in. Your “second official language” should be whichever of these languages you have the lesser ability, or no ability, in.

Once you have determined your level of proficiency in each skill, use the following chart to determine how many points you can claim for the Language Factor:

First Official Language (English or French)

Proficiency Level Speaking Listening Reading Writing
High 4 4 4 4
Moderate 2 2 2 2
Basic 1 1 1 1
No Ability 0 0 0 0

Second Official Language (English or French)

Proficiency Level Speaking Listening Reading Writing
High 2 2 2 2
Moderate 2 2 2 2
Basic 1 1 1 1
No Ability 0 0 0 0

If claiming points for “first official language”, you will have to submit proof of your abilities in that language. If claiming points for “second official language”, you will also have to provide proof of your abilities in that language.

You can prove your language abilities by:

  1. Taking an official language test administered by an approved organization; or
  2. Providing other written documentation to support your claim of abilities in the language.

If neither English nor French is your native language, take an official language test to prove any abilities you claim to have in these languages.

If you don’t take an official language test, the alternative written documentation you provide must clearly show that you meet the level of ability you are claiming (high, moderate or basic proficiency) for speaking, listening, reading and writing in English and/or French. Fast Canada Immigration can advise you of the written documentation you should provide.

WORK EXPERIENCE FACTOR (maximum 21 points)

To be eligible for Canadian permanent residence and to obtain points for the Experience Factor, you must have at least one year of work experience in at least one occupation listed in the National Occupations List (NOC) under the categories of “Skill Type 0 – Management”, “Skill Level A” or “Skill Level B”.

MacroGlobal Immigration services Ltd can advise you whether your work experience falls under Skill Type 0 – Management”, “Skill Level A” or Skill Level B” and what the NOC lists as duties and responsibilities for that occupation.

You will be awarded a set number of points depending on how many years of work experience you have:

Years of Experience* POINTS
One year 15
Two years 17
Three years 19
Four or more years 21

*The number of years of work experience are cumulative, must be in the last ten years, and do not have to be in the same occupation. For instance, if you have three years of work experience, you will get 19 points for the Experience Factor even if your three years of work experience is divided between 2 or 3 occupations.

AGE FACTOR (maximum 10 points)

The age you are (or will be) at the time your application is submitted to the consulate is the age that should be used in determining your points for the Age Factor. Use the following chart to determine how many points you should receive for the Age Factor:

AGE POINTS
16 and younger 0 points (minimum)
17 2 points
18 4 points
19 6 points
20 8 points
21-49 years old 10 points (maximum)
50 8 points
51 6 points
52 4 points
53 2 points
54 and older 0 points (minimum)

ARRANGED EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA FACTOR (maximum 10 points)

You will receive 10 points if you have a job offer in Canada, or if you are currently working in Canada on a valid work permit.

Job offer in Canada
  • You are outside Canada and do not intend to work in Canada before being issued a permanent resident visa
  • You do not presently hold a work permit for Canada
  • An employer in Canada has made a job offer to you for ongoing full-time work to begin after you obtain a permanent resident visa and enter Canada
  • The job offer must be approved by Human Resources Development Canada
Presently working in Canada on a valid work permit (HRDC approved work)
  • You are working in Canada on a temporary work permit obtained pursuant to a job offer that was approved by HRDC
  • The work permit is valid for at least 12 months from the date you submit your application for permanent residence
  • The employer has made an offer to continue employing you indefinitely after your permanent residence visa is issued
Presently working in Canada on a valid work permit (exempt from HRDC approval)
  • You are working in Canada on a temporary work permit that is exempt from HRDC approval according to international agreements (eg, NAFTA) or “significant benefits” (eg, intra-company transferee)
  • The work permit is valid for at least 12 months from the date you submit your application for permanent residence
  • The employer has made an offer to continue employing you indefinitely after your permanent residence visa is issued

ADAPTABILITY FACTOR (maximum 10 points)

The Adaptability Factor is intended to give you points for things that may enhance your ability to become successfully established in Canada. You may receive points for one or a combination of the following (up to a maximum of 10 points overall):

  1. Education of Spouse
  2. Previous work in Canada
  3. Previous study in Canada
  4. Arranged employment
  5. Relative(Blood relations) living in Canada
  • a) Education of Spouse (3, 4 or 5 points)

If your spouse or common-law partner is accompanying you to Canada, you may receive points for your partner’s education.

Look at the table provided above in the description of the Education Factor. Determine the number of points that your partner’s education corresponds to in that table:

  • If it corresponds to 12 or 15 points, you may receive 3 points for it under the Adaptability Factor;
  • If it corresponds to 20 or 22 points, you may receive 4 points for it under the Adaptability Factor;
  • If it corresponds to 25 points, you may receive 5 points for it under the Adaptability Factor;

 

  • b) Previous Work Experience in Canada (5 points)

If you or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner completed a minimum of 1 year of full-time (or full-time equivalent) authorized work in Canada, you may receive 5 points for it under the Adaptability Factor.

  • c) Previous Study in Canada (5 points)

If you or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner completed a minimum of 2 years of full-time (or full-time equivalent) authorized post-secondary study in Canada, you may receive 5 points for it under the Adaptability Factor.

  • d) Arranged Employment (5 points)

If you receive points for the Arranged Employment Factor (see above), or if your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has arranged employment in Canada, you may also receive 5 points for it under the Adaptability Factor.
(*Note: if it is your spouse or common-law partner who has the job offer, it must meet the criteria of one of the categories listed above in the description of the Arranged Employment Factor).

  • e) Relative (Blood Relations) in Canada (5 points)

If you or your accompanying spouse or common-law partner has a close relative who is a citizen or permanent resident of Canada, you may receive 5 points for it under the Adaptability Factor. “Close Relative” refers to the following familial relationships: father, mother, grandparent, son, daughter, grandchild, sister, brother, niece, nephew, aunt or uncle. (*Note: only 5 points may be awarded, even if there is more than one close relative in Canada).

You may receive no more than 10 points overall for the Adaptability Factor, regardless of how many of the above items you can claim.

SETTLEMENT OF FUNDS REQUIRED

Pursuant to R76(1)(b) a visa office will determine if an applicant has sufficient funds available for settlement in Canada. The amount of funds are determined by the number of family members (including both accompanying and non-accompanying dependants). The funds must be available, transferable and unencumbered by debts or other obligations. Applicants that have Arranged Employment (as defined by R82) do not need to meet these financial requirements.

Number of Family Members Funds Required
1 $10,833
2 $13,486
3 $16,580
4 $20,130
5 $22,831
6 $25,749
7 or more $28,668

We provide Canadian Immigration Services to clients across Edmonton, Calgary, Alberta, British Columbia, and all over Canada excluding Quebec.

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